The Snorgh in Chinese and Turkish

Last night, I stumbled across the Chinese edition of The Snorgh and the Sailor, and I was delighted to see what they’d done with the book. The title in Chinese is 长鼻子冒险家和长耳朵冒险家, or “Long Nose the Adventurer, and Long Ears the Adventurer”. I was wondering what the Chinese translators would do with “Snorgh”, and I think that “Long Nose” is an admirable solution. The cover text is nice as well, with the long nose and ears integrated into the Chinese character for “long” (click the image above to get the full-sized cover). Very clever! And to my surprise, the format is taller than it is wide, so I’ll be interested to get my hands on a copy to see how they have worked on the page layout.

As I am no longer in China, I like to imagine that Long Nose and Long Ears can act as ambassadors on my behalf. I’ll be following their activities closely. There’s a nice review of the Chinese edition here.

Meanwhile, over in Turkey, my wonderful publishers over there, Büyülü Fener, have let me know that their Turkish Snorghs have arrived in the office, and apparently the book is looking good. The Turkish title is Şnörk ve Denizci.

Book Review: The Snorgh and the Sailor at Christmas

So there I was, warming my toes by the fire in my little house, listening to the howl of the wind, when there was a knock, knock, knock! on the door. I put down my pen and went over to see who it was. ‘Writers don’t like visitors,’ I muttered to myself. ‘Particularly not when they are busy writing.’

But when I opened the door, I found it wasn’t a visitor. Instead it was the postman. And the postman handed me an envelope. I took the envelope and closed the door, then I went back to sit on my chair by the fire.

I opened the envelope and pulled out a book. And it was not just any old book. Instead it was a copy of the newly published picture book, ‘The Snorgh and the Sailor at Christmas’, a sequel to ‘The Snorgh and the Sailor.’

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There was a letter inside the envelope too, that said the book was written and illustrated by the amazingly talented members of class Primary 4D, from the Riverside Primary School in Falkirk. I looked at the map. The book had come a long way: miles and miles and miles, all the way from Scotland. I hadn’t realised that the Snorgh had travelled so far away.

The cover of this new book looked promising. It made me want to read on. So I opened up the book and discovered that since I’d last seen him, the Snorgh had come home from his adventures with the Sailor, and was living once again in his ugly little house. But the pictures also made me sad, because it was winter, and the Snorgh’s marsh looked very cold, and his nose was very red.

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Then I remembered that it was a couple of years since I had last called on the Snorgh, and I wondered how he was doing. I felt a bit guilty that I hadn’t gone to visit him for a while, and decided that I would do so this summer, when the weather was warmer.

I read on, and found that—to my dismay—the Snorgh seemed to have become even older and grumpier since I’d last seen him. But just as I was feeling very sorry for him, and wondering where the Sailor had gone, I turned the page, and there was a ‘Ho! Ho! Ho!’ at the Snorgh’s door.

It was the Sailor, back from his adventures. And I was surprised to find that he’d got himself a job since I last met him, delivering presents for Santa. He even had a proper Santa-hat and everything. But he’d clearly he’d bitten off more than he could chew and needed some help.

So the Snorgh and the Sailor set off again on another Great Journey, delivering presents for Christmas. And I’m not going to tell you exactly what happened, because that would ruin the surprise. But ‘The Snorgh and the Sailor at Christmas’ is a great sequel. It is exciting and funny and just a little bit sad, at least on the page where the Snorgh is lonely and has a very cold, red nose. And when you come to the end of the book, you will smile. Which means, in my opinion, that it must be a very good book indeed.

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All pictures © Class 4D, Riverside Primary School, Falkirk

PS You can buy the original Snorgh book here. I wrote it a few years back, and the great Thomas Docherty drew the pictures.

Upcoming Events

I’ve got a few events coming up over the next couple of months, including a couple of festivals. So next Saturday, I’ll be at the Lowdham Book Festival to talk about novels and novel-writing (the programme is here, with a rather out-of-date mugshot). This is Saturday 28th from 11am – 12pm, in Lowdham village hall. The Saturday is a full day of free events, so do come along and drop in.

Then in July, I’m doing a children’s event on writing and Snorghs at the Frome festival, as well as an adults’ event on moomins and philosophy, bringing a bit of Moominsummer Madness to Frome. These are both on the 4th of July. Here’s an article from the Somerset Guardian about these events.

There are a few more things coming up over the summer as well, so I’ll post here again when I have these confirmed.

Seven Stories Event

February looks like it is turning into a busy month; and I’m very pleased to be heading up to Seven Stories in Newcastle (my favourite UK city, by the way…) for a [amazon_link id=”1407116525″ target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]Snorgh[/amazon_link] event to tie in with World Book Day. This year’s World Book Day (the actual date of WBD is Thursday 6th March) at Seven Stories is all about Snorghs, sailors and adventures. So Tom Docherty and I are heading up north to do a warm-up event on Sunday 23rd February. Here’s the link to Seven Stories to find out more.

In Oldham

Well, I’m back in Leicester after a fantastic two days in Oldham, where I was at the 2013 Brilliant Books award. And the whole thing has been enormous fun. We writers and illustrators were all looked after incredibly well (the legendary Oldham Cheese Pie lived up to the whispered rumours), and it was a pleasure to meet teachers, librarians, schoolchildren and parents and see such enthusiasm for writing and literature, as well as to get to know some of my fellow-writers better.

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Brilliant Books 2013

A very quick post this, to say that I’m heading to Oldham today for the Brilliant Books 2013 award, and am very proud to say that [amazon_link id=”1407116525″ target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]The Snorgh and the Sailor[/amazon_link] is on the shortlist. The full list of shortlisted books is here — there are some great books on the list, and it’s good to be in such fine company.

Snorghs, Sailors, Philosophy and Mood

With apologies for cross-posting from my personal website; but I’m very pleased to have received this morning two copies of the Spring Issue of Interdisciplinary Humanities journal, which includes my essay on “What the Snorgh Taught me about Emmanuel Levinas”. It’s a fairly personal essay/paper about the questions around children’s literature, creative writing, research and philosophy. The paper started out when I began to realise that the process of writing my children’s book, [amazon_link id=”1407116525″ target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]The Snorgh and the Sailor[/amazon_link] was (whatever Martin Amis might say about children’s literature) one that fed back into my philosophical writing, opening up new questions and lines of inquiry.

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Philosophy, children’s literature and the question of branding

A couple of months ago, my children’s book, [amazon_link id=”1407116525″ target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]The Snorgh and the Sailor[/amazon_link], was published. It has been one of the most demanding and delightful projects I’ve ever been involved in. Who would have thought that eight hundred words would require quite so much redrafting?

I fell into children’s literature somewhat by mistake, after becoming friends with the illustrator Thomas Docherty. Tom is a wonderful artist, and a lovely man; but when we decided to have a go at working together, I can remember feeling a little apprehensive. Part of the reason was that I was not sure I could write for this age group. Another part of the reason was that I was a writer who spent his time working on philosophy and novels for adults, and I couldn’t really see how writing children’s books fitted in. Read more

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